• Captain Willem Schouten / Jacob Le Maire

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAuw4b4l83Q   The first to be honoured on the IACH Cape Horn Hall of Fame board in Les Sables d’Olonne are Dutch Captain Willem Schouten and his Flemish compatriot Jacob Le Maire who first discovered Cape Horn in 1616.They named it Cape Horn in recognition of the Dutch city of Hoorn where their fleet of ships had set out from and where Schouten was born.Captain Jacob Le Maire’s father, a prosperous merchant from Antwerp, had sponsored the voyage to find a western route to the Pacific Ocean and spice islands to circumvent the trade restrictions imposed by the Dutch East India Company. The Strait of Le Maire, the infamous channel northeast of Cape Horn separating the mainland from Staten Island, was named after him.

  • Vice Admiral Robert Fitzroy

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgMRX_tdCC4   The third of our celebrated Cape Horners is Vice Admiral Robert Fitzroy a British Royal Navy officer and scientist who Captained HMS Beagle on two expeditions to Cape Horn in the early 1800s - the second with famous biologist Charles Darwin onboard - to chart the surrounding waters and find a sea route through the islands to the Pacific, now named as the Beagle Channel. Fitzroy and Darwin spent time exploring Cape Horn and left a time capsule beneath a cairn of stones on top of the cape discovered in 1990. The capsule, a porcelain pot buried under the rocks, contained coins, a dinner plate from HMS Beagle, a Royal Marines belt buckle and a Royal Navy White Ensign.   The Award is presented to the Royal Navy and Royal Navy Sailing Association in England, represented today by Capt. Nigel Chambers

  • Capt. T.C Fearon

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    The 4th of our sailors to be inducted into the Cape Horn Hall of Fame is Capt. T.C Fearon – A veteran of 36 roundings of Cape Horn.Capt. Fearon was born in Cumbria in the Northwest of England where the toughness of the land made many adventurous lads take to the sea – including Lord Nelson.Apprenticed aboard a Cape Horner at the age of 15, Fearon’s first passage was in an 800-tonne barque carrying a cargo of steel rails from Newport, Wales non-stop to Portland, Oregon, and back with grain to Liverpool – two 16,000 mile runs with Cape Horn to defeat on each.He graduated to 2nd Mate at 19, Mate at 22 and made Master at the age of 30 spending the rest of his career on Cape Horn passages. His 36 roundings may well  be a record.

  • Capt. Vern Verner Björkfelt

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shQYJrw0cCM   The Finnish Capt. Vern Verner Björkfelt who commanded the German built Finnish 4-masted barque Pamir, the last windjammer to round the Horn bringing to an end to three centuries of trade around the world under sail. Björkfelt, who rounded Cape Horn 10 times during his career, left left Port Victoria, South Australia 28th of May 1949 bound for Falmouth England with Pamir carrying 3,780 tons of barley. She rounded Cape Horn on 11th of July 1949 and completed the 16,000-mile voyage in 128 days.  Thereafter, owners found that they could no longer operate these sailing ships at a profit against the efficiencies of motor-powered ships.  

  • Capt. Adolph Hauth

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    The 6th inductee into the Cape Horn Hall of Fame is German Capt. Adolph Hauth, the last Master of the German 4-masted barque Priwall between 1937–1939.  In 1938, Priwall recorded the fastest ever westward rounding of Cape Horn by a commercial sailing ship with a time of 5 days 14 hours. In those days of commercial sail, a rounding of the Horn involved sailing the 1,000 miles from 50 degrees South on one coast of South America to 50 degrees South on the other coast, the two benchmark latitudes of a Horn run.

  • Capt. Louis Allaire

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    The 7th inductee is the French Capt. Louis Allaire, the founding President of de l'Amicale Internationale des Capitaines au Long Curs Cap Horniers, the forerunner to the International Association of Cape Horners.The French association of Cape Horners came about during a lunch held at the Hôtel de l’Univers in St Malo attended by some 30 sailing ship captains who had all rounded Cape Horn. Three captains, Yves Menguy, Auguste Briand and Alfred Jean were charged with setting it up, and in May 1937, 35 fellow French Captains were invited to Marie Turmel's hotel-restaurant Aux ajoncs d'or, in Saint-Malo. The first committee was made up of Louis Allaire, President, François Hervé and Francis Lhotellier, vice-presidents, Auguste Briand secretary, along with Yves Menguy and Eugène Allée.  They created the first Cape Horners magazine Le Courrier du Cap.Capt Allaire spent 24 years at sea starting as a 17-year-old apprentice aboard the French 3-master Circle carrying nitrate from Chile and iron ore from New Caledonia. His first command in 1910 was the 3-masted Germaine bound for New Calendonia.  In 1912/13, he commanded the 3-masted Yves de Kerguelen on hydrographic surveys and meteorological research in the Indian and Pacific oceans, and also made an expedition to the French islands of St Paul and Amsterdam.

  • Alan Villiers

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FfUEu4Bzzs   Alan Villiers was an Australian seaman, historian and a founder of the modern sail training.  He grew up around Melbourne docks watching the commercial sailing ships come and go, and  joined the barque Rothesay Bay as a 15-year-old apprentice, trading between Australia and New Zealand.  Villiers later joined the great explorer and whaler Carl Anton Larsen and his whaling  factory ship, the Sir James Clark Ross,  the largest whale factory ship in the world, weighing in at 12,000 tons. Villiers’ account of his first voyage was published as Whaling in the Frozen South. Villiers' working passage aboard the Herzogin Cecilie in 1927 resulted in the publication of Falmouth for Orders, the first of 47 books he wrote about life on the ocean during the dying days of commercial sail.Villiers wanted to document life aboard the great sailing ships before it was too late and wrote By Way of Cape Horn after his experiences crewing the full-rigged Grace Harwar from Australia to Ireland in 1929. The voyage took 138 days and led to the  film The Cape Horn Road In 1934 Villiers purchased the Georg Stage, a 400 tonne fully rigged sailing ship built in 1882.  Villiers circumnavigated the globe with an amateur crew and used the environment of the sea to build character and discipline in his young crew and developed the modern concept of sail trainingThe Award is presented to the Sail Training International represented by Chairman Jonathan  Cheshire who sends this message

  • Vito Dumas

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Vito Dumas (September 26, 1900 – March 28, 1965) was an Argentine single-handed sailor who set out on a solo circumnavigation of the of the Southern Ocean in 1942, while the world was in the depths of world War II  He left Buenos Aires on 27 June, sailing LEHG II, a 31-foot ketch equipped with only the most basic and makeshift gear.  he had no radio, for fear of being shot as a spy, and was forced to stuff his clothes with newspaper to keep warm.Making only three landfalls, the legs of his voyage were the longest that had been made by a single-hander in what was seen as a powerful retort to a world which had chosen to divide itself by war.  Dumas recounted the experience in his book Los Cuarenta Bramadores: La Vuelta al Mundo Por la "Ruta Imposible" (Alone Through The Roaring Forties).He donated his boat to the Argentine Navy but after a few years of neglect, she was finally wrecked against a pier at the entrance of La Plata's port in 1966. A wealthy Argentine yachtsman paid to have her restored and LEHG II is now on display in Tigre on the River Plate.

  • Marcel Bardiaux

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    French sailor Marcel Bardiaux completed the first singlehanded circumnavigation west-about via Cape Horn and the Cape of Good Hope, taking 8 years to complete his course.  He set out from Ouistreham, France on May 24,1950 in his home-built 30ft 9in (9.37m) yacht Les Quatre Vents and returned to Arcachon, France on July 25, 1958. He began building his wooden yacht Les Quatre Vents in 1943 and set out his pioneering 68,000 mile voyage around the globe via Dakar, Rio de Janeiro, Cape Horn, Ushuaia, Valparaiso, Papeete, Durban, Saint-Hélène, Pointe-A-Pite and New York where he received the prestigious Blue Water Medal , awarded by the Cruising Club Of America He continued voyaging around globe well into his 80’s.  During a winter Atlantic crossing between Halifax and France in November 1994, Bardiaux, then 84, experienced hurricane winds and was washed overboard. Saved by his tether, the Frenchman managed to pull himself back onboard and reached France after 33 days at sea.After cruising some 400,000 miles – the equivalent of 18 circumnavigations -  Bardiaux’s legacy is his book: Aux 4 Vents del L’Aventure. 1 le defi au Cape Horn,  and his two yachts which have been restored.

  • Sir Francis Charles Chichester

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Sir Francis Charles Chichester (17 September 1901 – 26 August 1972) was a pioneering British aviator who became the first person to sail solo around the globe via the three great Capes with just one stop  in 1966–67 for which he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II In 1960, he entered and won the first Single-Handed Trans-Atlantic Race in the 40ft (12.2m) yawl  Gipsy Moth III. He came second in the second race four years later behind Eric Tabarly.Chichester  set out from Plymouth on 27 August 1966 sailed his ketch Gipsy Moth IV  and returned after 226 days of sailing on 28 May 1967 to become the first person to achieve a true circumnavigation  from West to East via the 3 Great Capes, stopping only in Sydney, Australia. The voyage was also a race against the clock, with Chichester attempting to beat the typical times achieved by the fastest fully crewed clipper ships during the heyday of commercial sail. His global voyage was the first to be commercially sponsored, with the International Wool Secretariat’s Woolmark logo on the bows and his baseball cap.  He was also supported by The Sunday Times newspaper, and the public interest this achieved led to the newspaper sponsoring the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in 1968/9 – the precursor to the current Golden Globe Race

  • Sir Alec Rose

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrVJJt-_isQ   Sir Alec Rose (13 July 1908 – 11 January 1991) was an English fruit merchant who developed a passion for amateur single-handed sailing after serving in the Royal Navy during World War II.  He went on to circle the globe with just two stops, was knighted by the Queen and his yacht Lively Lady is now used for sail training by a charity led by Alan Priddy.When Rose heard that Francis Chichester intended to sail single-handedly around the world, he was keen to compete. He attempted to start at approximately the same time as Chichester sailing Gypsy Moth IV in 1966, but mechanical failures and a collision off Ushant meant he had to postpone the start until the following year. The voyage began on 16 July 1967. and Rose arrived in Melbourne after 155 days at sea. Among the people who came to watch Rose's arrival was Prime Minister Harold Holt, who disappeared later the same day after going for a swim. Rose stopped once more, an unplanned call into Bluff Harbour, New Zealand, to repair a damaged mast.The voyage was closely followed by the British and international press and Rose's landfall back in Portsmouth UK on 4 July 1968, 354 days after he set off, was met by huge crowds. Knighted on 10 July 1968, he was also made a Freeman of the City of Portsmouth the same year and Freedom of the City of London in 1969.Rose's voyage is detailed in his book My Lively Lady. He wrote a children's version, Around the world with Lively Lady (1968) and another book My favourite tales of the sea (1969).The yacht Lively Lady is now managed by the Around and Around charity founded by Alan Priddy and is currently undergoing a major refit to get her coded before circumnavigating Britain with a crew of youngsters.  Another round the world voyage is planned.

  • Sir Robin Knox-Johnston

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTbSgtIgRw4   Sir Robin Knox-Johnston is our first live Hall of Fame inductee.  The pioneering British sailor became the first person to complete a solo non-stop circumnavigation of the Globe on winning the first Sunday Times Golden Globe Race back in 1968/9.  He has continued to set markers throughout his life, winning the British Yachtsman of the Year Award four times, and World Sailing yachtsman of the year  once.  On 14 June 1968 Knox-Johnston left Falmouth, UK in his 32-foot (9.8-metre) traditional yacht Suhaili, one of the smallest boats to enter the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. Despite losing his self-steering off Australia, he rounded Cape Horn on 17 January 1969, 19 days ahead his closest competitor Bernard Moitessier. Moitessier who had set sail from Plymouth, England 2 months later but subsequently abandoned the race ‘to save my soul’. The other seven competitors dropped out at various stages, leaving Knox-Johnston to win the race. He donated his £5,000 prize money for making the  fastest circumnavigation, to the family of Donald Crowhurst, another competitor who had committed suicide after attempting to fake his round the world voyage.During the 1977/8 Whitbread Round the World Race, Robin skippered the British maxi yacht Condor on legs 2 and 4, taking the winning gun on both occasions.In 1994 Knox-Johnston and his co-skipper Peter Blake won the Jules Verne Trophy for the fastest circumnavigation  in the catamaran ENZA New Zealand, with a time of 74 days 22 hours 18 minutes and 22 seconds. It was their second attempt to win this prize after their first one in 1992 had to be aborted when their catamaran Enza New Zealand hit an object which tore a hole in the starboard hull.At 68, Sir Robin completed his second solo circumnavigation in 2007 aboard his 60ft (18.3m) yacht Saga Insurance, finishing 4th in the Velux 5 Oceans Race. Sir Robin is now Chairman of the Clipper Round the World Race, encouraging amateur sailors to follow in his wake around the Globe

  • Bernard Moitessier

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Bernard Moitessier (April 10, 1925 – June 16, 1994) is a legend within the solo sailing world. The French sailor  might well have set the fastest solo non-stop circumnavigation in 1968 during the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. Having started 6 weeks behind the eventual winner Robin Knox-Johnston, Moitessier had narrowed the time to 19 day when he rounded Cape Horn. But instead of chasing the English leader back up the Atlantic to the finish, Moitessier turned east and go round the world again “To save my soul.” He eventually dropped anchor in Tahiti. Moitessier had already made a name for himself as a long-distance sailor after sailing his yacht Joshua from Chile via Cape Horn to Spain. He was a reluctant participant, concerned that the Sunday Times newspaper was commercialising one of the last great challenges left to man. A succession of gales and calm periods characterised Moitessier’s voyage across the Southern Ocean where became depressed and discovered yogo as a means to controlling his moods, he started to think of not returning to Europe, which he saw as a cause of many of his worries. Once passed Cape Horn, he experienced a south-easterly gale which reawakened these thoughts and he turned east for the Cape of Good Hope.  This inner turmoil was explained in a note catapulted onto the deck of a ship anchored in Table Bay in which he explained, "parce que je suis heureux en mer et peut-être pour sau her mon âme" ("because I am happy at sea and perhaps to save my soul").Though driven and competitive, Moitessier passed up the chance of instant fame and and sailed on for three more months before finally dropping anchor in Tahiti Although he abandoned the race, Moitessier still circumnavigated the globe, rounding the Cape of Good Hope and then sailing almost two-thirds of the way around a second time, all non-stop and mostly in the Roaring Forty latitudes,  setting a record for the longest nonstop passage by a yacht, - 37,455 nautical miles in 10 months.Moitessier's book, The Long Way, tells the story of his voyage as a spiritual journey as much as a sailing adventure and is still regarded as a classic of sailing and adventuring literature.

  • Sir Chay Blyth

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PG8KxqJ25nI&feature=youtu.be   Sir Chay Blyth, our second live inductee, is another sailing pioneer – the first to sail single-handed non-stop westwards around the world against the prevailing winds and currents in 1971 aboard his a 59ft (18m) ketch British Steel.As a Sergeant serving in the British Green Beret 3rd Parachute regiment, the Scot set a record, rowing across the Atlantic with Captain John Ridgway in 1966 in the 20ft (6m) open dory English Rose III, completing the distance from Cape Cod to Ireland in 92 days.The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was another challenge that excited him, and with no previous sailing experience, he set out from Southampton aboard a 30ft (9m) yacht bilge keeled cruising yacht Dytiscus. Remarkably, he managed to round the Cape of Good Hope, before finding out that the design was no match for the Southern Ocean and retired to Port Elizabeth. Undaunted by the experience, Blyth was spurred on by Robin Knox-Johnston’s ultimate success in the Sunday Times Golden Globe race to sail around the world the other way to become the first person to sail solo non-stop westwards, setting a pioneering record of 292 days in 1972. As a result he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).In 1973, Blyth skippered a crew of paratroopers aboard the 77ft (23.5m) yacht Great Britain II, winning the first Whitbread Round the World Yacht Race on elapsed time. He returned again in 1981/2, skippering the same yacht, renamed United Friendly, which was the first British yacht to finish. Later Blyth founded the Challenge Business to organise a series of round the world races for amateur crews in 1992/3, 1996/7 2000/1 and 2004/5 for which he was knighted in 1997.

  • Ramón Carlín

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFif4Vewl9k             https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A6XVjhoApQ            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2z_vnsWYxDc   Ramón Carlín, the ‘weekend sailor’ who upset the odds to become the winner of the first Whitbread Round the World Race in 1973-74, died in Mexico City at the age of 92. Carlín was a complete unknown in the sport when he entered the event, which later became the Volvo Ocean Race, having made his fortune selling washing machines and other white goods in his native Mexico. By 1973, he was seeking new challenges. He assembled a crew of good, but unheralded sailors, before upsetting some of the era’s leading names of offshore sailing, by winning the race on handicap with his Swan 65, Sayula II. He didn’t insure Sayula II for the race, saving the premium to cover necessary repairs. The crew only discovered this as they approached the finish with only 14 of the 19 strands of the forestay still intact. After the race, in which three rival sailors died in the 19-strong fleet, Carlín returned home to a presidential reception in Acapulco and became Mexico’s most famous yachtsman.

  • Éric Tabarly

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVgLLVGmL_s   Éric Tabarly is the doyen of ocean racing to all young aspiring sailors.  A French Naval officer, he gained instant fame with his yacht Pen Duick II after winning the 1964  Observer Singlehanded Trans Atlantic Race in the record time of 27 days 3 hours. He returned home to a ticker-tape parade up the Champs Elysees, was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur by President de Gaulle, and the Blue Water Medal from the Cruising Club of America.In 1967, Tabarly won the Channel Race, Round Gotland Race, and Sydney to Hobart Yacht Races on Pen Duick III. He also won 1969 San Francisco-Tokyo race and in 1971 was victorious in the  Falmouth-Gibraltar and Middle Sea Races before going on to win the famous Transpac from Los Angeles to Hawaii the following year. In 1973, he skippered Pen Duick VI in the first edition of the Whitbread but was dismasted. He returned for the 1976 Whitbread, but Pen Duick VI was disqualified for not having a valid rating certificate. The rules had been changed, banning the use of uranium in her keel.  Undaunted, Tabarly continued as an unofficial entry and completed the course.In 1980, Tabarly sailed the trimaran Paul Ricard across the Atlantic and broke the century old record set by Charlie Barr in the huge schooner AtlanticTabarly went on to skipper the Belgian maxi yacht Cote d’Or in the 1985/6 Whitbread. 

  • Cornelis van Rietschoten

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hg9VbXdiR5Q   Cornelis "Conny" van Rietschoten is the only skipper to win the Whitbread Round the World Race twice.At 45, the Dutch industrialist had read reports about the first Whitbread Race, saw it as the opportunity of a lifetime – and grabbed it with both hands entering in the 1977–78 Whitbread Round the World Race.What set him apart from established sailing names was the business approach he brought to his campaigns. His eight-year tenure at the top of the sport spelled the end of amateur gung-ho ocean racing entries for he set levels of professionalism within the sport that were not repeated until Peter Blake also won every leg with his Steinlager 2 in the 1989–90 Whitbread Round the World Race.His first Whitbread campaign sailed in the 65ft (19.8m) ketch Flyer saw his crew surprise everyone by winning the first leg into Cape Town. There was no surprise by the time they returned to Portsmouth as overall winners.Van Rietschoten returned for the 1981/2 Whitbread, this time with a 76ft (23m) maxi yacht also called Flyer, with the intention of winning line honours and to set a new record. The crew did that with ease, finishing 1st into every port, and setting a new record for the circumnavigation of 120 days.  What surprised everyone was that Conny and his crew also won the race on handicap too – the first crew to win both line and handicap honours in the history of the Race. Van Rietschoten and his crew also set two world records: The fastest Noon to Noon run of 327 miles, and the fastest circumnavigation of 120 daysSince the 1980s the Conny van Rietschoten Trophy has been awarded each year to recognise the best Dutch sailor

  • Dame Naomi James

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIy73iN-fHo Dame Naomi James, became the first woman to sail  solo around the world via Cape Horn with one stop in 1978, completing her circumnavigation in 272 days, beating Sir Francis Chichester's solo round-the-world sailing record by two days.Raised in New Zealand, she met her future husband Rob James  in Saint-Malo, in 1975 who was skippering a charter yacht for Chay Blyth.  She learned about sailing from Rob, and while waiting for him to return from an ocean race and marry her, she made the decision to sail single-handed around the world, non-stop. She told Rob of her dream during their honeymoon, when had only six-weeks sailing experience. Chay Blyth lent her his 53-foot (16 m)  yacht Spirit of Cutty Sark (later renamed Express Crusader), others raised money for supplies, and the Daily Express newspaper sponsored the voyage. Naomi James was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1979 in recognition of her achievements, and was named New Zealand  Sailor of the Year.

  • Kay Cottee

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7m4Ssq-x80&feature=youtu.be   In 1988, Australian Kay Cottee  became  the first woman to complete a solo non-stop circumnavigation , taking 189 days in her 37 feet (11 m) yacht Blackmores First Lady,.Before returning to a hero’s welcome in Sydney, Cottee's yacht was knocked down several times in the Southern Ocean and on one occasion she was washed overboard. Rounding Cape Horn, she celebrated with a lunch of crab, mayonnaise and self baked bread, and a bottle of Grange, a prestigious Australian wine.Cottee used the voyage to raise more than $1M for the Rev. Ted Noffs' Life Education Programme and undertook an 18-month national schools tour, speaking to over 40,000 high school students, imparting the message that anyone can achieve their dreams if you work steadily towards them.After the voyage, Kay was named Australian of the Year,  appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia. And became th first  Australian recipient of the Cutty Sark Medal. She was inducted into the Australian Sailing Hall of Fame in 2017

  • Jon Sanders

    • Hall Of Fame Inductees
    • Posted by IACH Webmaster
    • 08-09-2022

    Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMw4mfhbCXg   Australian Jon Sanders was the first man to circumnavigate Antarctica solo, circling the continent twice in 1981 – 1982 in his S&S 34 monohull Perie Banou, . His course took him south of the three great capes: Horn, Good Hope and Leeuwin, before rounding Cape Horn a second time. He turned north to Plymouth, UK and returning south around Good Hope a second time before returning to Fremantle.This voyage is recognised in the Guinness Book of Records as The first single-handed sailor to remain continuously at sea twice around the worldFirst single-handed sailor to round the five southernmost Capes twice on one voyageFirst single-handed sailor to round the five southernmost Capes twiceLongest distance continuously sailed by any yacht: 48,510 miles (78,070 km).Longest period alone at sea during a continuous voyage: 419 days: 22 hours: 10 minutesIn 1986 Sanders set out again from Fremantle, and this time completed three solo non-stop circumnavigations aboard his 47-foot (14 m) yacht Parry Endeavour, rounding Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago just north of the Equator each time to ensure that his course covered both hemispheres.In 2016, Sanders set out from Carnarvon, Western Australia on his tenth circumnavigation, which he completed on 20 December 2017.On the 31 January 2021 Sanders completed his eleventh circumnavigation, which makes the 81 year old one of the oldest persons to sail singlehanded around the world.Sanders was made an Officer in the Order of the British Empire in 1983 was and inducted into the Single-Handed Sailor's Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island, USA in 1991.In 2018 Sanders was inducted to the Australian Sailing Hall of Fame.